O Levels English Revised Syllabus 2011

Cambridge O Level English Language Syllabus code 1123
General Information
  1. Paper 1 (Writing) is 1:30 One and Half Hours. MARKS: 60
  2. Tasks: Directed Writing and Creative Writing 30+30 Marks (Separate Answer Sheet) WORDS: 200–300 for Directed Writing and 350–500 for Creative Writing.
  3. Paper 2 (Reading) is 1:45 One Hour and Forty Minutes. MARKS: 50
  4. Tasks: Reading for Ideas and Reading for Meanings 25+25 (Attempt on the Question Paper)
  5. Marks Divisions (Paper-1) :  Directed Writing: 15 task fulfillment and 15 for language.  Creative Writing: 30 Language+Content Combined.
  6. Marks Divisions (Paper-2) Reading for Ideas: 15 for content points, 5 for summary and 5 for main ideas questions. Reading for Meaning: 25 content only.
  7. The long passage has been replaced with two passages in Paper 2 (Comprehension) One Factual and the Second Narrative
  8. The Writer Paper – 2 gives equal weighting to both Creative and Directed Writing
Paper 1: Writing

1 hour 30 minutes, 60 marks
This paper has two sections and candidates answer on a separate answer sheet.

Section 1: Directed Writing (30 marks)
• Candidates are presented with a task, e.g. write a letter, speech, report, article, fit for purpose and relevant to the world of study, work or community.
• Candidates should write 200–300 words to inform or persuade a particular audience.
• 15 marks are allocated for task fulfillment and 15 marks for language. There are only THREE Content Points…now

Section 2: Creative Writing (30 marks)
• This is an essay, testing language and content combined.
• Candidates answer one question from a choice of 5 narrative/descriptive/argumentative essay titles and should write 350–500 words.
Paper 2: Reading

1 hour 45 minutes, 50 marks
This paper has two sections and candidates answer on the question paper.
Section 1: Reading for Ideas (25 marks)
• Candidates scan a factual communication (or communications) of approximately 700 words – e.g. report(s), article(s), advertisement(s), email(s), letter(s).
• They identify and note down required information – e.g. similarities and differences, or causes and
effects, or advantages and disadvantages, or problems and solutions, or actions and consequences.
• 15 marks are allocated for content points.
• Candidates use these notes to write a summary of 160 words. 5 marks are allocated for language.
Candidates then answer questions on the main ideas in the communication(s) – e.g. follow an argument/sequence or identify a conclusion, distinguish fact from opinion, give personal response to a theme in the passage.
• These will be short answer questions worth 5 marks.
Section 2: Reading for Meaning (25 marks)
• Candidates read a narrative passage (e.g. report, article, story) of approximately 700 words.
• They then answer short answer questions testing their ability to understand the language (both explicit and implicit meanings).

O Level’s English Tips from Cambridge Examiners

For no-nonsense, practical revision help, read these Top Ten Tips from some of Edexcel’s 15,000 examiners…

  1. If you find that reading over revision notes just before an exam relaxes you, feel free to do so, but be aware that in most cases it could make you more nervous; any new information is not normally absorbed at this stage.
  2. On the day of the exam, when you are told to turn the paper over, don’t start writing until you have read the exam paper from cover to cover. 
  3. Mark the topics you wish to answer and concentrate on them.  You should have an idea of how much time you are going to spend on each question with the ones carrying the most marks getting the most allocated time. 
  4. Remember that the exams are not set to trip you up, but are designed to allow you to show your knowledge of the specification.  Be positive and have confidence in your ability. 
  5. Take time to consider the question.  Look at where the marks are to be gained and allocate time appropriately (and stick to it). Too many candidates spend too much time earning and re-earning small numbers of marks, thereby losing time for the heavier-tariff tasks.  Remember, answering three questions fairly well is better than answering one very well and leaving two badly done.  Underlining key words in the question may help to focus your mind and jog your memory. 
  6. Structure your answers by making an answer plan; writing this down will help. 
  7. Don’t forget to refer back to the question to help ensure that you answer the question asked.  The examiner can’t give you marks for your knowledge and understanding of a topic if you don’t answer the specific question properly, i.e. don’t answer the question you wish you’d been asked rather that the question in front of you.  Try and read your answer through before moving on to the next question. 
  8. Concentrate on your punctuation, spelling and grammar. Remember that, whilst you will not be marked down for bad handwriting, if the examiner cannot read what you have said, then they can’t give you the marks you deserve. 
  9. Try and relax, and keep an eye on the clock without checking it every five minutes.  You need to leave time to complete each question and to read through your answers before the end of the exam. 
  10. Once you have finished the exam, don’t worry about it and try to avoid comparing your answers with other students.  Now the examiners’ hard work begins!

KET Cambridge Speaking Test Script

KET Speaking Part 1
Interlocutor:
Good morning. Can you give me your mark sheets, please? Thank you. I’m Sue Ireland and this is Jill Buggey. She will just listen to us. Now, (to Julio) what’s your name?
Julio:
Julio Caesar

Interlocutor:
Thank you. And your name?
Tuba:
Tuba Can
Interlocutor:
Tuba?
Tuba:
Uh-huh
Interlocutor:
And what’s your surname, Tuba?
Tuba:
Can
Interlocutor:
How do you spell that?
Tuba:
C-A-N
Interlocutor:
Uh-huh. And what’s your surname?
Julio:
Mendoza
Interlocutor:
Mendoza? How do you spell that?
Julio:
M-E-N-D-O-Z-A
Interlocutor:
Thank you. Um.. Julio, where do you come from?
Julio:
Mexico
Interlocutor:
Uh-huh. What town are you from in Mexico?
Julio:
Monterrey
Interlocutor:
Uh-huh. Do you work in Monterrey or are you a student?
Julio:
Er…work and student (Uh-huh) yeah
Interlocutor:
What do you study?
Julio:
Lawyers administration
Interlocutor:
Do you like it?
Julio:
I like it
Interlocutor:
Uh-huh. Why?
Julio:
Because er… it’s..er…it’s er…I don’t know. The …career?
Interlocutor:
Uh-huh.
Julio:
…is good.
Interlocutor:
Thank you.
Julio:
Yeah
Interlocutor:
Um…Tuba, where do you come from?
Tuba:
Turkey
Interlocutor:
Uh-huh. What town are you from in Turkey?
Tuba:
Troy
Interlocutor:
Uh-huh. Do you work in Troy or are you a student?
Tuba:
Now I’m a student here. I was a student before in Turkey.
Interlocutor:
What do you study in Turkey?
Tuba:
I study politics.
Interlocutor:
Uh-huh. Do you like it?
Tuba:
Uh-huh. Yes, I like it.
Interlocutor:
Why?
Tuba:
Because I like politic (Uh-huh) Politic subjects.
Interlocutor:
Okay. Um…Tuba, when did you come to England?
Tuba:
Um…end of September?
Interlocutor:
Uh-huh. How did you travel?
Tuba:
By plane.
Interlocutor:
Yes. Uh-huh. Have you been to any other countries?
Tuba:
I have been to Cyprus before … but that’s it, not more.
Interlocutor:
Julio, what do you do in your free time in Cambridge?
Julio:
Free time… um.. I don’t know. I like see TV (Uh-huh) and play basketball.
Interlocutor:
Uh-huh. How often do you play basketball?
Julio:
Er… I like it (Uh-huh) Yeah.
Interlocutor:
What are you going to do this weekend?
Julio:
Er…I go to the cinema (Uh-huh). I see Shakespeare in Love.
Interlocutor:
Right. Thank you. Um, Julio, tell me something about your family.
Julio: .
Okay, my family, I have a father, a mother and one brother…big? (Uh-huh) And my grandfather, my grandmother and my uncles. It’s a great peoples
Interlocutor:
Thank you. Um…Tuba, tell me something about Troy.
Tuba:
Um…it’s on the coast..er…there are..er..the population is not a lot. Um..and quite warm…but very hot in summer (Uh-huh) So it’s nice.
KET Speaking Part 2
Interlocutor:
Right. Thank you. In the next part you are going to talk to each other. Julio, here is some information about a tennis club. Um Tuba, you don’t know anything about the tennis club so ask Julio some questions about it. Use these words to help you. Do you understand?
Both
Yes
Tuba:
When does tennis club open?
Julio:
The … opens at 8am to 9pm.
Tuba:
Uh-huh. What’s the address?
Julio:
The address is 23 Norman Road (Uh-huh)
Tuba:
How much does it cost? (Yes)To play there?
Julio:
Yes, the cost is £20 for a month
Tuba:
Uh..er..are there lessons every day?
Julio:
Is..er..every afternoon
Tuba:
Um…what’s the telephone number?
Julio:
Okay. Telephone number is 0163 700584.
Tuba:
Uh-huh.
Interlocutor:
Right. Thank you. Tuba, here is some information about a concert. Julio, you don’t know anything about the concert so ask Tuba some questions about it. Use these words to help you. Do you understand?
Both:
Yes
Julio:
hat music concert?
Tuba:
Guitar music … concert from Spain.
Julio:
Okay. Where is the…concert?
Tuba:
On 44 Water Street.
Julio:
What day is the concert?
Tuba:
Friday, twenty-three February
Julio:
How much er.. the student’s tickets?
Tuba:
Um..it costs…£10?
Julio:
£10. What time start ..er..the concert?
Tuba:
7.30
Julio:
Okay
Interlocutor:
Right. Thank you very much. That’s the end of the test.